Courageous Cook Off Winners & Thai Gift Sets!

Courageous Cook Off Winners & Thai Gift Sets!

Last month we challenged our Instagram friends to a Thai food themed Quarantine Cook-Off. We were blown away by all of the creativity!

Our instructions were simple: create a Thai inspired dish, post on social media, and tell us what courage means to you. Here are a couple of the standout meals submitted from around the globe:

Papaya Salad submitted by Mony Hean

“Courage to me is the willingness to face fear, embrace uncertainty and to stand up for one’s beliefs!”

Amen, Mony. We couldn’t agree more!

Longtime CK supporter and volunteer, Daniel Saguin, said these powerful words:

“Courage means learning more about yourself, your culture, and your traditions while being open to things you don’t know- histories that are both good and bad.”

Daniel’s ‘Kanom Jin’, an herb topped fragrant red curry with vermicelli rice noodles

And last but not least the winners of the challenge: Henry and Barbara from California who said:

“Courage is stepping out of your comfort zone, entering the unknown, seeking to improve your life and the lives of those around you.”

At Courageous Kitchen this is exactly what we strive to do every single day: improve the lives of others. With the uncertainty in our current climate, it’s important for us to remember that something as simple as growing your own food or sharing a meal can make a tremendous impact in reducing food mileage, healing your body, and the environment. By providing fresh produce and a hot meal for our students it can mean the difference of whether or not to they are going hungry that night.

Winners: Vegan Red Curry Ramen by Henry and Barbara.

We were so impressed with everyone’s dishes, but especially by your words of wisdom. Thank you to Henry and Barb for the beautifully presented meal. As our winners they will be receiving a Thai Cooking Kit full of our favorite ingredients like palm sugar and coconut milk, so they can keep perfecting their favorite dishes!

For those of you who didn’t have the chance to enter, don’t fret! Our friends from Taste of Thailand have curated an “I love Thailand” care box for those residing in the country. Each box contains items from small businesses and local purveyors, including homemade sauces from our students in the Courageous Kitchen.

The ‘I Love Thailand’ gift set for your favorite food enthusiast.

Care boxes will be delivered straight to your doorstep and with every sale, you’re ensuring the purchase of two meals for those in need. To our US and Canadian friends, don’t you worry because we’re crafting up something equally as exciting for you all. Be on the lookout for details. The trio of sauces included feature homemade sriracha, pad thai sauce, and Thai chili jam (aka nam prik pao).

We are grateful for the continued support from friends like you which allows us to feed and educate families throughout Bangkok. We hope you had fun participating in our Quarantine Cooking Challenge and we can’t wait to see what you’re all crafting up for the next one!

For anyone who missed the chance to participate, be sure to follow @courageouskitchen on instagram!

7 Tips to Stay Safe As Covid-19 Quarantine Ends

7 Tips to Stay Safe As Covid-19 Quarantine Ends

Hey friends around the world, we hope you are healthy and getting back to ‘normal’ where-ever you are. The new normal, however, is being honest about the challenges we’re facing during the covid-19 epidemic and sharing high quality advice whenever possible. Whatever stage of lock down or quarantine your country is in, here are some tips to help you stay safe.

1) Don’t neglect the basics.

  • Wear a mask
  • Wash hands
  • Avoid touching your face
  • Avoid activities causing unnecessary exposure
  • Limit interaction with people at risk
  • Remember you can spread the virus without being sick
  • Exercise and eat healthy

We’ve got songs for washing our hands now. Masks are becoming more readily available, and you’ve learned to keep hand sanitizer with you wherever you go. During this time we have even seen people going to extremes by wearing hazmats suits in grocery stores. This is evidence that we are learning to be better together, but we shouldn’t let our guard down as we return to work, school, and other activities. Please keep your hygiene practices up to maintain the basic level of protection for everyone.

Distributing reusable masks by going door to door in vulnerable communities.

Our organization Courageous Kitchen has been helping refugee communities with soap, reusable masks, and information to prevent the spread of the disease here in Bangkok, Thailand.

2) Avoid Confined Spaces

Many of us have to interact with others during this period for crisis response, work, and other necessities. When possible avoid confined spaces, especially where air can be trapped or is unfiltered. Although many places have restricted gathering in public parks, take advantage of any outdoor or open air areas which can allow people to meet while facilitating social distancing.

For example, instead of distributing aid to people in need in groups, we bring the items door to door. Of course this is more work, but we have to adapt to the challenges of doing aid under such conditions. Aid organizations, governments, and volunteers have a responsibility to provide aid safely, while ensuring efforts to help are not unintentionally spreading the disease to vulnerable groups.

3) Briefly Journal Interactions

One quick tip you can employ right at this moment is to begin journaling your interactions. In the face of disease that can be transmitted without symptoms we have to take new precautions and this is a simple, free task most anyone can perform.

“Until a vaccine is available, the more we return to normal, the greater our responsibility to society becomes.”

  • Did you meet anyone unexpectedly today?
  • Were you in close proximity to that person?
  • Did you cough more than normal today or experience any other symptoms?
  • Did you go somewhere high risk? Or interact with someone who may become sick easily?

Make a note on your phone or in a notebook of symptoms, interactions, and abnormal risk. Hopefully, you will never need to use this information, but in an emergency, this tiny task can quickly become invaluable to you and your family.

Finally, as soon as I begin showing symptoms of any infection, remember you are responsible for notifying people you may have exposed. This is a big, scary task. Having a journal of interactions, including brief occurrences will help us notify people more quickly of their exposure, and may even help us to identify how we became infected.

4) Have A ‘Coming Home’ Routine

Typically doctors, nurses, and medical staff are the ones who shoulder the responsibility of creating daily routines to prevent disease spread. For healthy people who are still working or in the community providing aid, this is now becoming part of our daily life. Thinking ahead to create a routine for arriving home can keep you from bringing infectious germs into your home.

Keep in mind your routine may be unique to you and your circumstances. For some this may be as simple as washing hands and cleaning personal items before coming in the house (keys, mobile phones, and things in your pockets). The proactive activity could happen in your front yard, garage, or some condos and apartment building may provide soap or hand sanitizer in the lobby.

Making these practices a habit can help everyone prevent the spread of the disease to our loved ones.

5) Be Considerate of the Most Vulnerable

Healthy people who have the ability to return to work and leisure activities must also spare concern and consideration for those who may never have any semblance of normal in the coming years. The most vulnerable people are groups such as the elderly, pregnant mothers and newborns, and immunocompromised. However, in this group we need to also consider people who are vulnerable due to their socioeconomic status. This may because of lack of resources, information, or living in crowded conditions where social distancing is made impossible. For example we have seen countries where the disease had been somewhat contained, only to ravage through crowded dorms and detention centers holding migrant workers and refugees.

Courageous Kitchen staff giving instructions on wearing and washing masks (left), and a mom helps her son put on his reusable mask correctly (right).

We have to do our best to be more considerate of those most heavily impacted. For more on this topic, read our list of 10 Ways to Help the Most Vulnerable During this Pandemic.

6) Keep Cautious Friends

Social distancing has changed our lives. We’ve begun doing more via video calls and online communication than we ever thought possible. However, as we return to gathering socially with family and friends, we should maintain a certain level of caution. This includes distancing or limiting interaction with people who don’t maintain the same level of concern about the virus. We have no way of knowing where someone has been, or their level of exposure to possible infection, our best protection is to be cautious or avoid meeting people in the early days of quarantine ending altogether.

“I was at the pharmacy today and someone was having a coughing fit. I know we were supposed to meet tomorrow, but let’s talk online instead to be safe.” – A Responsible Friend

This does not mean we need to publicly shame people who aren’t following guidelines to our liking. However, we do want to limit interaction with people being casual about virus prevention, irresponsible with their hygiene, or spreading misinformation about the disease. To prevent this from causing friction in the workplace, school, and in social groups, don’t wait until face to face meetings to bring up topics about safety.

7) Enjoy Lunch Alone

One of the things we consider being the most social, may put us in danger — our coveted time eating together at our table. Whenever the time to eat comes around, people should be ready to carve out their own personal space. This is important because when eating you may let your guard down by removing masks and gloves, and relaxing social distancing.

When working or in public, try to maintain your distance from others while eating. For those who can, arrange meetings or work tasks in way that you can eat at home or the car. Other suggestions may be packing snacks or quick meals for work, while saving more substantial meals for home.

Until a vaccine is available, the more we return to normal, the greater our responsibility to society becomes. If we understand this, stay compassionate, and plan accordingly we can help save lives together.

Thank you for reading and if you have other great suggestions during these unprecedented times, please share. We hope you are healthy, stay safe, and appreciate your support of Courageous Kitchen.

10 Ways to Help the Most Vulnerable During the Covid-19 Crisis

10 Ways to Help the Most Vulnerable During the Covid-19 Crisis

The world has been engulfed by the current health crisis surrounding the coronavirus, Covid 19. We have seen global travel come to a halt and local businesses closed indefinitely. As a charity fundraising by offering cooking classes in Bangkok, we have also been impacted by the abrupt end to tourism.

The quiet days however, have given us plenty of time to brainstorm how we as an organization can make a difference in the communities we serve in Bangkok. Like a lot of communities around the world there are areas of the city that have all the perfect conditions for rapid spread of the virus, including: poor sanitation, compact and crowded housing, varied language and cultural contexts

Our team going door to door to give away reusable masks, food aid, and preventative info in a refugee community in Bangkok, Thailand.

This has forced us to ask difficult questions about the likelihood of an outbreak in those areas, and hypothesize about our response. Today we want to share a few ideas with you, and invite everyone, whether organizations or individuals, to start thinking strategically about assisting the most vulnerable during this time.

Feel free to adapt and expand these ideas for your locality, and to share them with others. We encourage everyone to give to organizations helping this fight, and don’t forget you can make calls and advocate online from the safety of your home.

1) Free Testing and Treatment

The easiest way to help vulnerable people is to make sure they have access to testing and treatment freely. This should happen regardless of people’s ability to pay, or nationality.

“We can’t treat what we can’t track…”

While different governments have had different policies, those most successful in combating the spread understand made testing widely available. We can’t treat what we can’t track, and this virus is unique in its ability to be spread by people with few or no symptoms. If there is no policy for testing and treatment for those at risk, please continue to advocate a vocal advocate for this crucial need on and off line.

2) Quarantine or Isolation Beds

Space is a luxury many communities do not have. While social distancing has become a common term for many, the tactic to prevent the spread is unrealistic, especially in crowded cities. One idea would be to look at repurposing space in communities to provide quarantine or isolation areas. This may mean different things in different places. For some communities the priority may be on housing the homeless temporarily, while other highly dense areas could provide food and shelter to elderly or immunocompromised people most at risk. This may mean rethinking how best community spaces like schools, community centers, and others can best serve. Communities can even repurpose unused space or buildings.

3) Soap & Sanitation Stations

Provide free access to sanitation and supplies that help prevent the spread of the disease. This may mean complex projects like portable sinks or showers, or be as simple as makeshift community refilling stations where people can bring their containers and refill on soap. Masks could be provided freely, or people can learn in small groups how to repurpose household items as makeshift masks and face guards. Weather permitting, this could be done in open air areas in small groups, but it may be best to make these solutions portable to prevent crowding, and reach people with limited mobility.

Kids look on as their parents refill plastic containers with liquid hand soap donated by Courageous Kitchen.

4) Food Sponsorship Programs

One of the essential businesses allowed to continue operating are restaurants. We can support these local businesses and lean on their relationships with the community to serve the most vulnerable. A simple program would allow me to purchase a meal, while providing a meal to someone else. In turn, restaurants could provide food, cash, or products to local organizations — or even give it our directly to people. Partnerships with schools, churches/ temples, and community centers would speed this response.

5) Donate to Existing Organizations

Find an organization in your area and donate. Choose large and small organizations to support, and especially those who already have programs in place for assisting the sick, elderly, or vulnerable communities.

Keep in mind organizations are under a lot of pressure. They have to provide aid while protecting their staff, and insuring while helping people they are not spreading the virus from one place to another. Remember as the economic impact worsens, small charities who really depend on small $10-$100 individual donations, will see many of these resources dry up.

6) Jail & Detention Moratorium

Included in the communities most at risk to the spread of disease are the incarcerated. We should remember them during this time and be sure they have the supplies and care needed. In most cases you can assume they do not.

Governments should also not use this time to enforce petty laws or warrants. Compassionate responses would include a moratorium on immigration raids and arrests as well. However, it is unlikely government will come to these conclusions on their own and we can be busy advocating for such solutions online or sharing petitions for such calls.

Knowing this can be controversial, we would like to reiterate that this isn’t forgiveness of immigration status, or an end to law enforcement. Instead, it should allow enforcement to focus on the most serious issues, and provides some consideration for exposure and spread of the virus by law enforcement agencies.

7) Bolster Neighborhood Clinics & Pharmacies

We have to do what we can to make sure people can get the medicine they need nearby. This is essential for non covid related issues, and for people whose symptoms are mild enough to recover from the virus at home. This also relieves some pressure from our hospital systems, who are already being overwhelmed in so many places around the world.

In visits limited to people’s doorway, we can see the community has been making use of their masks, answer questions, and identify at risk groups like pregnant women, elderly, and the disabled.

8) Sponsorship for the Pregnant and Elderly

Sign up with an org today to sponsor a pregnant woman, or someone who has recently given birth. Make sure these women have the protection and transportation they need to get to hospitals safely. Remember this should include a long term vision for check ups, immunizations, and emergencies. Support for food and housing also helps ensure women and their children are safe and supported during this crisis.

There are so many neglected elderly people everywhere in the world. In addition to checking up on people in your own family, make sure people who don’t have family or resources are well cared for, whether that’s providing cash, groceries, or a friendly weekly checkup call for people who are even more isolated than usual right now.

9) Free Mental Health and Mourning Resources

Are we prepared for the conversation we need to have about mourning people we’ve lost? How do we do this from a distance? Do impoverished communities have the resources they need to deal with the death and burial of someone who dies at home?

There are so many questions to answer about mental health and mourning during this period. While they may seem peripheral to so many other pressing concerns, we should be careful not to be blindsided by the compounding ramifications of the loss of a loved one, isolation, and financial instability.

10) Free Wifi

Sounds simple, but lets not underestimate how much this could make a different in at risk communities.

Having good information and the ability to connect with people from afar has never been so important. Let’s remember people who may not have regular access to the internet, or whose services may be impacted because of loss of work by someone in their family.

Online communication also eases the burden of organizations who may be deciding which situations are most urgent, especially in changing rapidly cases. If people are connected they can be provided information, have that information translated, be entertained, and even talk face to face with volunteer doctors and nurses who can save time and reduce risk with such activities.

We hope these ideas have been helpful for you! Please help us to share and kindly consider visiting our donation page to support our work in Thailand.

Order A CSA Box Full of Organic Fruit and Vegetables in Bangkok

Order A CSA Box Full of Organic Fruit and Vegetables in Bangkok

ทางเลือกผักสดๆจากฟาร์มส่งตรงถึงบ้านคุณ

What is CSA? CSA = “community supported agriculture”

CSA คืออะไร? เค้าคือกล่องผลิตผลทางการเกษตรจากชุมชนเพื่อชุมชน

CSA Box – A subscription service delivering fresh produce from farmers directly to consumers with the goal of better supporting farmers.

An organic fruit and vegetable filled CSA box from Veggie Favour.

CSA box คือการสมัครสมาชิกเพื่อรับผลิตผลทางการเกษตรต่างๆ โดยส่วนมากจะเป็นผักผลไม้ตามฤดูกาล เพื่อให้ผู้บริโภคอย่างเราได้รับผลผลิตจากเกษตรกรโดยตรง และสนับสนุนคนภายในชุมชนท้องถิ่นด้วยกันเอง

In most cases the ingredients in each delivery are not set, giving the farmers flexibility to provide you food based on seasonality and not rigid menus.

ผลผลิตแต่ละรอบโดยมากจะไม่สามารถกำหนดได้ (ความสนุกอยู่ตรงนี้) เพื่อให้เกษตรกรได้เพาะปลูกและเก็บเกี่ยวผลผลิตตามฤดูกาลอย่างแท้จริง

To increase the value and avoid food waste, remember you can order and share with other family members, friends or neighbors.

เพื่อเป็นการเพิ่มมูลค่า ลดการสร้างขยะและวัตถุดิบเหลือทิ้ง เราสามารถสั่งกล่อง CSA box และแชร์กับญาติพี่น้องในละแวกบ้านใกล้ๆกันหรือเพื่อนบ้านก็ได้

ด้านล่างนี้ เราได้รวบรวมรายชื่อของกลุ่มเกษตรกรหรือร้านค้าที่มีบริการ CSA box มาแนะนำค่ะ

Farmtastic

Veggie Favour

  • Farm: Nakhon Chai Si, Nakhon Prathom, Thailand
    • CSA Box: 100-300 baht (deposit for box required)

OrgBox Thailand

One of the largest and most diverse CSA boxes is available from local restaurant Bolan.

Bolan Restaurant

  • Local restaurant offering high quality food, CSA boxes, and a cooking essentials box.
    • LineID: bolanoffice
    • 022602962
    • CSA Box: 800 baht (includes recipes, curry, coconut milk and eggs, delivery not included)
    • http://www.bolan.co.th/

The Basket ตะกร้าผักจากสวนของคุณ

6 Tips for CSA Newbies:

  1. Be flexible. At the heart of CSA is being open to what farmers have on offer. Take that spirit into the kitchen when preparing and making use of your produce.
  2. When in doubt, stir fry. Don’t have time to look for a recipe for those alien looking leaves and veggies? Don’t stress. Throw them in the wok with noodles and your favorite seasoning.
  3. Covid-19 isn’t a foodborne illness. While you should be cautious with everything at the moment, food is an arena with fewer worries. Don’t get lax though, continue to wash your hands, surfaces, and produce religiously.
  4. Prevent spoiling. When your veggies arrive, have a plan for how to store them. Keep in mind some fruits do better outside of the fridge. Do your best not to forget about them because organic veg doesn’t have the same shelf life we’ve become accustomed to with things from the grocery store.
  5. Share. Got ideas on a great smoothie for digestion? Created a recipe apt for seasonal veg? Love to pickle, candy, and jam your produce? Be sure to spread those ideas, especially among our youth!
  6. Ask. Don’t know a vegetable? Ask your producers or online community. Need a quick answer? Try one of the many free apps like ‘PictureThis’ for a quick and fairly accurate answer.

Hey Bangkokians, we hope this list is helpful for you, especially during times when people are doing their best to avoid venturing too far from home.

This isn’t an exhaustive list, and we know there may be more new companies in the future. With all of the options, be sure to share with friends and in your favorite online communities. Be safe and support a farmer!

Notice of Virus Precautions Policy

Notice of Virus Precautions Policy

The past few weeks have been a trying time for everyone around the world. Wherever you are reading from, we do wish you good health and would like to share our concern and condolences to anyone who has been directly impacted by the corona virus Covid-19.

At the moment we have few guests or activities planned. However, if you do have a cooking class booked, we want to make sure everyone is aware, we consider your health, and the health of our staff is of the utmost importance.

As an organization whose mission is so closely tied to the handling and cooking of food, we are well prepared to make sure we maintain a safe working and learning environment. We need your help to continue to follow the best practices during this time, and support organizations like ours that work with communities particularly vulnerable to viral disease.

This includes our regular hygienic equipment:
* Air conditioning
* Air purifier
* Anti-bacterial soap
* Water filtering and purifying

Our regular hygiene practices:
* Sanitizing surfaces
* Soap at every sink (there’s 3!)
* Limited class size

And new policies:
* Postponed or canceled gatherings with over 10 people
* No new volunteers will be accepted
* Refusing guests with symptoms of illness or poor hygiene
* Refunding guests as necessary (minus any booking fees)
* Providing more online recipes and cooking courses for you (if you have a request let us know!)

To limit the spread of the virus we may need to refuse service to guests or refund guests who are unable to visit due to travel restrictions. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this causes.

Like so many people around the world, we’re still trying to wrap our minds around going from daily cooking classes to only a few a month. Our social enterprise is crippled, but we hope to one day get it roaring again. If you would like to help through donations, they would be greatly appreciated and put to use helping those in need.

In the meantime, we will still be working with marginalized youth and their families in small groups. As there is often poor information in these communities, we’re hoping to teach people and prevent the spread of the virus to their communities. Otherwise, we will be testing recipes and hopefully sharing more pdf and video resources so that you can join us in cooking delicious Thai food wherever you may be.

Thank you for your understanding, be safe, and let us know if you’ve got a Thai recipe request that would brighten your day!

Thai Plant Based Cooking Class in Bangkok

Thai Plant Based Cooking Class in Bangkok

Plant Based แบบไทยๆ ใช้กระทะใบเดียวก็เฟี้ยวได้

ขอเชิญพี่ๆน้องๆ มาลองกิน ลองทำ 5 เมนู อาหารพืชผัก ที่สามารถนำไปทำทานได้จริงที่บ้าน!

We’re hosting our very first plant based cooking class in Bangkok. The event will be a Thai language class taking place on Monday, March 23rd at 3pm. Guests who book will have the opportunity to learn how to make 5 plant based dishes. The workshop style dinner experience should be a fun time of learning and celebrating healthy eating together.

Instruction for the class will be in Thai, led by Panisha Chanwilai, a manager at Courageous Kitchen. Panisha grew up helping her mom in the kitchen, who let her assist, as she made spicy Southern Thai dishes. Panisha converted from the hectic office lifestyle and diet, to become a food and nutrition enthusiast. Today she is a plant based eating devotee and trainer, endlessly experimenting with new ingredients. She will share about her journey, and why she believes plant based eating may be more simple than you believe.

The workshop and dinner is aimed at busy Thais who may not have time to do recipe research or spend hours cooking. Panisha has done her best to simplify a few of her favorite dishes, and is excited to share them with an open minded group. She hopes all of the participants walk away more confident in their ability to create healthy, nutritious meals at home.

The dishes include:

1. Spicy Smoked Eggplant Dip, Nam Prik Ma Kua Yao น้ำพริกมะเขือยาว
2. Spicy Mushroom Salad, Yum Hed Ruam ยำเห็ดรวม
3. Stir Fried Red Curry with Tempeh, Tempeh Pad Prik Kaeng เทมเป้ผัดพริกแกง
4. Essential Veggie Soup, Kaeng Jued แกงจืดหมูก้อนวีแกน
5. Coconut Snowballs, Kanom Tom ขนมต้ม

The cost to participate in this inaugural plant based cooking class is 1000 baht per person. The dinner is limited to 15 participants and takes place in Panisha’s home in Sukhumvit 101/1. Book your seat by sending your bank transfer receipt to line id panisha_p. Detailed directions will be sent to all confirmed guests.

Note: For health reasons we reserve the right to refuse participants who are coughing, sneezing, or visibly sick.